HOW DO YOU WIN THE GAME?

The team with the most points after two 30-minute periods wins the game.  Each period is made up of individual “jams” lasting no longer than two minutes each.

 

HOW DO YOU SCORE POINTS?

The skater with a star on her helmet is the jammer.  Each team has one jammer.  The jammer is the only skater who can score points by passing blockers on the opposing team.  If jammers are not in bounds or they make illegal contact with opposing skaters while passing, they do not score points.  Also, jammers do not score on their initial pass through the pack.

 

WHO ARE THE BLOCKERS?

There are up to four blockers from each team on the track at one time.  Together, the eight blockers make a pack.  Blockers play offense by assisting their jammer while at the same time playing defense and blocking the opposing jammer.

 

WHY DOES ONE SKATER HAVE A STRIPE ON HER HELMET?

The girl with the stripe is called the pivot.  The pivot is a blocker who sets the pace of the pack.  She watches for the opposing team’s jammer and calls out plays accordingly.  If a jammer passes her star helmet cover to the pivot, the pivot can take over the jammer position, but not lead

jammer status.

 

WHAT DOES “LEAD JAMMER” MEAN?

The lead jammer is the first jammer to pass through the pack legally.  The lead jammer is the only person who can call off a jam prior to the full two minutes.  She calls off the jam by repeatedly placing her hands on her hips.  The lead jammer is identified by a jammer ref pointing to her with “L” shaped arms while following beside her inside the track until her first scoring pass.  Sometimes there will be no lead jammer and the jam will last the full two minutes.

 

WHY ARE SKATERS SENT TO THE PENALTY BOX?

Skaters are sent to the penalty box when they have committed a penalty.  The penalty time starts once the skater sits in the seat, so it is essential that she get to the penalty box quickly once she is sent.  The standard time in the box is 30 seconds, but skaters can do additional time for accruing additional penalties.

 

WHAT ARE SOME NO-NO’S IN BLOCKING?

  • No back blocking or pushing

  • No forearms, clothes-lining or elbowing

  • No grabbing, holding, pulling or tripping

  • No intentional falling in front of an opposing skater

  • No fighting or biting

 

DID YOU KNOW?

WFTDA released a new version of The Rules of Flat Track Roller Derby.  These rules officially went into effect for all WFTDA-sanctioned play on February 15, 2017. This is the ninth edition of rules the WFTDA has developed and published since the organization created the first shared rules for the sport of women’s flat track roller derby in 2005.  

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This edition introduces some notable changes to gameplay and game structure, reviewed and developed by the WFTDA Rules Committee with input and guidance from WFTDA and MRDA member leagues, including:

  • Modifying the threshold for a Cutting the Track penalty (previously Rule 5.11) to allow a Skater to immediately yield position in order to avoid a penalty

  • Updating the metric for penalty assessment for low blocks/tripping (previously rule 5.3) and use of illegal blocking zones (previously rule 5.4) to be consistent with other metrics for impact

  • Updating rules related to helmet covers to clarify that covers cannot be hidden and that a helmet cover removed due to game play is not a loss of Lead Jammer status

  • Modifying Penalty Box rules as follows: (1) allow for entry to the box in any direction; (2) removal of a penalty for leaving the box after completion of penalty time without instruction to do so; (3) allow for teammates and support staff to enter the box so long as they do not fully enter

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